Angie in the News

Sioux Falls Business Journal

January 9, 2012

 

The Question and Answer feature helps readers learn more about prominent people in the business community. This issue’s Q&A profiles state Sen. Angie Buhl, D-District 15. She’s a small-business consultant with Aflac.

 

http://www.argusleader.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2012301060020

 

By Jon Walker

 

Taxes, texting and pay raises dominated a forum Thursday where Sioux Falls area legislators looked ahead to their annual session that opens next week in Pierre.

About 300 people in a breakfast audience at the Ramkota heard lawmakers discuss schools, driving habits and South Dakota’s political leadership, but most of the talk came back to the single issue of money.

by Jenna Mann
January 05, 2012

 

Days from now, 105 lawmakers will make their way to Pierre to begin another legislative session. The budget's been their focus for a couple years now, and it'll remain a top priority this year.

With breakfast eaten and coffee poured, it's time to get into the hard questions.

"How different do you think things would have turned out had Scott Heidepriem defeated Dennis Daugaard?" asked moderator Jack Marsh.

"I think that if there was a Democratic governor in office then I think we'd be in a better place" answered Sen. Angie Buhl (D-Sioux Falls).

Posted Jan 4, 2012

By Alex Ronallo

 

http://www.ksfy.com/story/16449498/taking-a-look-at-the-iowa-influence

 

When we asked Democratic analyst and South Dakota State Senator Angie Buhl and Republican analyst Kermit Staggers if the Iowa Caucuses influence the South Dakota primary, they said it's unlikely.  Buhl says, "I think it's tough to say that Iowa really influences South Dakota."

Both analysts say you have to consider the timeline for the votes: Iowa happens in January and then South Dakotans don't cast ballots until June.  Staggers says, "by the time we have our primary in June in South Dakota, the person who's going to become the nominee for the parties has already been determined."  Buhl goes on to say, "four/five months is an eternity in politics and how the conversation goes nationally."

Paid for by Angie Buhl O'Donnell for Senate.